Whether you’re heading out to win another competition, just catching some fish with mates, or pulling in a succulent feed of crayfish; having the right tool for the job certainly makes all the difference. Dean Castle reviews the all-new 600 Xpression – find out if it left a smile on his face!

The Xpression 600’s takeno- prisoners bow with impressive flare and generous beam were the first features of this craft to catch my eye. Make no mistake; this craft was built to be at the back line off Durban’s coastline where you can get some good catch and I was rather excited to get the firstever look at this craft.

Let’s take a look and see what else is on offer.

Deck layout

Aimed squarely at fishermen, included in the standard package are four gunwale-mounted rod racks, a live-bait well at the transom, and a fish hatch in the bow; though you do get more on the base fare, such as some very well put together stainless steel work, the stand-up centreconsole with built in storage, and the driver’s seat with lean-back cushion, to name just a few.

Six metres (19.6 foot) may not be tremendously huge to be a comfortable fisher – and although she can take a total of six on board, bank on fishing three up without having to get too friendly with your mates. To increase the fishability of this craft, the driver’s backrest flips from leaning backwards when you’re cruising to leaning forward (and providing rear-facing seating) when you’re trolling. A centreconsole like this is hard to beat on practicality since the open stern area gives you the opportunity to fight a fish with little interference – while using the rear-facing seat as something of a resting chair.

Fitted on the transom is a neat livebait well and is accompanied by a sink with a flip-up bait board as well as a stainless roll bar. Take note that no rod holders have been added onto this boat, which gives you the option to go with your preferred choice of quality and quantity rod holders. The Xpression 600 comes standard with a full wet deck and selfdraining scuppers and the deck itself is finished off with a non-slip pattern which should prove effective no matter how rough it gets out at sea. The centre console is double-sized, and when paired with the optional bimini top, it allows both the skipper and passenger to enjoy plenty of protection from the sun. Personally, I’d splurge a bit and opt for the canopy because no one goes home when the fish are on the bite, no matter how under the weather you are. The helm offers a bit of protection in the form of a windscreen which you may find a little small if you go out in less than ideal conditions. If this isn’t your type of fishing day, look forward to enjoying the breeze as you motor along.

There’s more than enough storage space on this craft, located under the skipper’s seat, inside the helm, under the bow seating, and of course inside the fish hatch when it’s not in use.